Eggcellent reasons to celebrate World Egg Day

It’s World Egg Day this Friday (11th October).

To mark this eggcellent occasion, we’ve been running social media polls to find out how our lovely guests like their eggs in the morning.

Poached came in at first place – it seems our guests would opt for a delicious, runny yolk served over a slice of toast as their top pick.

Second place was a tie between fried and scrambled.

Last place was boiled, which only received one vote from our Facebook and Instagram followers.

Egg is always one of the most popular choices on our Sun Inn breakfast menu, so we’re eggcited to celebrate World Egg Day this year!

The annual event is an international celebration on the second Friday of October. The day was created in a bid to raise awareness of the nutritional benefits of eggs and the role they play in feeding families across the globe. The day was first established at the International Egg Commission conference held in Vienna in 1996.

Eggs are an important part of a well-balanced diet – they’re tasty, convenient and are a high-quality source of protein.

The humble egg has a myriad of health benefits. These are just a few eggxamples…

  • Eggs are one of the most nutritious foods on the planet. Just one egg contains 14 essential nutrients, including vitamins A, B, D and E. They’re also a source of calcium, selenium and iodine. They pack a punch when it comes to protein too, with six grams per egg!
  • They’re a natural source of choline, which can aid healthy brain development. Choline plays an important role in building cell membranes – therefore impacting a number of vital functions within the body. It aids healthy brain development and also plays an important role in metabolism and liver function.
  • Eggs can reduce the risk of heart disease. Eggs contain high density level (HDL) – also known as ‘good’ cholesterol. Studies have shown that higher levels of HDL can lower the risk of heart disease in healthy people.
  • They improve eye health. Eggs are a great natural source of vitamin A, which is important for good eye health. The yolks also contain powerful antioxidants that can counteract some degenerative processes affecting eye health.

Did you know the following eggciting facts?

  • You can spin an egg to tell if it is raw or hard-cooked. If the egg spins easily, it’s hard-cooked. If it wobbles, then it’s raw.
  • You can also use a similar trick to see if an egg is fresh or stale. Fresh eggs sink in water, whereas stale ones float.
  • If you drop an egg on the floor, you can sprinkle it heavily with salt and it makes the clean-up easier!
  • The yolk colour depends on the diet of the hen. But the brown or white colour of an eggshell is purely dependent on the breed of the hen.
  • Eggs age more in one day at room temperature than in one week in the fridge.
  • An average hen lays between 250 to 300 eggs a year; and to produce one egg, it takes a hen 24-26 hours. As she grows older, she produces larger eggs.
  • Ostriches lay the largest eggs of any living species (about 15 centimetres long, 13 centimetres wide and weighing almost 1.5 kilograms).
  • There is a place in the Bahamas called Egg Island, where there are chickens owned by residents of other islands who visit the island to collect the eggs of their chickens.

If you would like to celebrate World Egg Day with a eggstraordinarily delicious breakfast, call us on 015242 71965 to book a table this weekend.

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